Category Archives: Mindfulness

Taking care of that spiritual side even if its hidden deep deep down inside of us

TED- How to stay calm when you know you’ll be stressed

You’re not at your best when you’re stressed. In fact, your brain has evolved over millennia to release cortisol in stressful situations, inhibiting rational, logical thinking but potentially helping you survive, say, being attacked by a lion. Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin thinks there’s a way to avoid making critical mistakes in stressful situations, when your thinking becomes clouded — the pre-mortem. “We all are going to fail now and then,” he says. “The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be.”

 

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Infographic- The Benefits of Yoga

TED: When to Take a Stand- and When to Let it Go

Ash Beckham recently found herself in a situation that made her ask: who am I? She felt pulled between two roles — as an aunt and as an advocate. Each of us feels this struggle sometimes, she says — and offers bold suggestions for how to stand up for your moral integrity when it isn’t convenient.

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Infographic- The Science of Happiness

Essential Oils Collection

Chamomile – The odour is sweet, tobacco-like and fruity, apple-like. It adds a warm, long-lasting, rich undertone in perfumes. Chamomile is a mild, soothing oil and is popular in massage blends and other herbal preparations. Aromatherapy benefits: calming, relaxing, soothing.

Cedarwood – Cedarwood essential oil actually comes from a type of juniper known as Juniperus virginiana, whose common name is eastern red cedar. The balsamic-woody aroma of cedarwood oil evokes a feeling of inner strength and centeredness. It is quite useful in times of emotional stress and anxiety to overcome feelings of powerlessness.

Eucalyptus Of the 300 species of eucalyptus trees in the world, Eucalyptus globulus is the best known. Eucalyptus has long been used in topical preparations such as liniments and salves. Cineole is the major constituent. Aromatherapy benefits: purifying, invigorating.

Grapefruit It has a fresh, sweet, bitter, citrus aroma. It is used to scent citrus perfumes and colognes, soaps, creams and lotions. Aromatherapy benefits: refreshing, cheering.

Lavender Lavender oil is used in baths, room sprays, toilet waters, perfumes, colognes, massage oils, sachets, salves, skin lotions and oils. It has a sweet, balsamic, floral aroma which combines well with many oils including citrus, clove, patchouli, rosemary, clary sage and pine. Aromatherapy benefits: balancing, soothing, normalizing, calming, relaxing, healing.

Lemon The scent is evocative of the fresh ripe peel. Lemon oil in the bath or in massage oils should be well diluted as it can cause skin irritation. Caution: avoid using the oil in body care products when going out into the sun as it can cause redness and burning of the skin. Aromatherapy benefits: uplifting, refreshing, cheering.

Orange, Sweet More sweet orange oil is produced than any other citrus oil. It has a lively, fruity, sweet aroma. It is used to scent fruity and eau de cologne fragrances. All citrus oils are quick to deteriorate and should be stored in a cool, dry, dark area in full containers. Aromatherapy benefits: cheering, refreshing, uplifting.

Peppermint Peppermint has a powerful, sweet, menthol aroma which, when inhaled undiluted, can make the eyes water and the sinuses tingle. Aromatherapy benefits: vitalizing, refreshing, cooling.

Rosemary Rosemary is known as the herb of remembrance. The plant produces an almost colorless essential oil with a strong, fresh, camphor aroma. It’s used in many citrus colognes, forest and Oriental perfumes, and eau de cologne. Rinses for dark hair often contain rosemary, as do room deodorants, household sprays, disinfectants and soaps. Aromatherapy benefits: clarifying, invigorating

Tea Tree The leaf of the tea, or ti, tree had a long history of use by the indigenous peoples of Australia before tea tree was “discovered” by the crew of the famous English explorer James Cook. The aroma of the oil is warm, spicy, medicinal and volatile. It is occasionally used to scent spicy colognes and aftershaves. It blends well with lavandin, rosemary and nutmeg oils. Aromatherapy benefits: cleansing, purifying, uplifting.

Carl Honore: In praise of slowness

MIT professor Neil Gershenfeld talks about his Fab Lab — a low-cost lab that lets people build things they need using digital and analog tools. It’s a simple idea with powerful results.

ASAPScience- The Scientific Power of Meditation

How exactly does meditation affect your body?

ASAPScience- The Scientific Power of Thought

The Scientific Power of Thought

TED Talk- Stefana Broadbent: How the Internet enables intimacy

We worry that IM, texting, Facebook are spoiling human intimacy, but Stefana Broadbent’s research shows how communication tech is capable of cultivating deeper relationships, bringing love across barriers like distance and workplace rules.

Essential Oils

First do no harm- figured the worst thing that could come out of an essential oil experiment would be a better smelling house so I got myself started with these:

ayan                                            oils

So my kit included:

Lemon-

Lemon oil can be very beneficial to the circulatory system and aids with blood flow, reducing blood pressure and helping with nosebleeds. It can help bring down fever, helps relieve throat infections, bronchitis, asthma and flu.

It boosts the immune system and cleanses the body, improves the functions of the digestive system, and it is helpful with constipation, dyspepsia and cellulite.

Lemon oil soothes and relieves headaches and migraines and is helpful for rheumatism and arthritis. It is also used for clearing acne, cleaning greasy skin and hair, as well as removing dead skin cells, easing painful cold sores, mouth ulcers, herpes and insect bites.

Lemongrass-

Lemongrass oil revitalizes the body and relieves the symptoms of jetlag, clears headaches and helps to combat nervous exhaustion and stress-related conditions.

It is a great overall tonic for the body and it boosts the parasympathetic nervous system, which is a boon when recovering from illness, as it also stimulates glandular secretions.

It is useful with respiratory infections such as sore throats, laryngitis and fever and helps prevent spreading of infectious diseases. It is helpful with colitis, indigestion and gastro-enteritis.

Lemongrass oil helps tone the muscles and tissue, relieves muscle pains by making the muscle more supple. It helps with correcting poor circulation and as an insect repellant. It helps to keep pets clean of fleas, ticks and lice.

It also is used for clearing up oily skin and acne, as well as athlete’s foot. It alleviates excessive perspiration.

Peppermint

Peppermint oil is excellent for mental fatigue and depression, refreshing the spirit and stimulating mental agility and improving concentration. It helps for apathy, shock, headache, migraine, nervous stress, vertigo and faintness and in general respiratory disorders, as well as dry coughs, sinus congestion, asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, tuberculosis and cholera.

For the digestive system, peppermint oil is effective for a range of ailments, as it stimulates the gall bladder and the secretion of bile. It is used for colic, cramps, dyspepsia, spastic colon, flatulence and nausea and can relieve pain in cases of toothache, aching feet, rheumatism, neuralgia, muscular pains and painful periods.

On the skin, peppermint oil is used to relieve skin irritation and itchiness and also helps to reduce skin redness, where inflammation is present. It is used for dermatitis, acne, ringworm, scabies and pruritus and also relieves itching, sunburn and inflammation of the skin, while at the same time having a cooling action.

Lavender-

Lavender oil has a soothing and calming effect on the nerves, relieving tension, depression, panic, hysteria and nervous exhaustion in general and is effective for headaches, migraines and insomnia.

It is also very beneficial for problems such as bronchitis, asthma, colds, laryngitis, halitosis, throat infections and whooping cough and helps the digestive system deal with colic, nausea, vomiting and flatulence.

Lavender oil relieves pain when used for rheumatism, arthritis, lumbago and muscular aches and pains, especially those associated with sport.

On the skin, lavender oil tones and revitalizes and it is useful for all types of skin problems such as abscesses, acne, oily skin, boils, burns, sunburn, wounds, psoriasis, lice, insect bites, stings and also acts as an insect repellent.

Lavender oil is one of the few essentials oils that can be used neat on the skin, and this is especially useful when treating a minor burn wound.

Tea Tree- 

Tea tree oil is very important in the health of the immune system, as it acts as a immuno-stimulant and increases the body’s ability to fight off any infections, while it also is used to revive the mind and body after shock.

The world over, this oil is used with great effectiveness to ward of infections of any kind, and it is active in all three varieties of infectious organisms:

  • bacteria
  • fungi and
  • viruses.

It can help with influenza, cold sores, catarrh, glandular fever and gingivitis.

A course of massage with tea tree oil before an operation may help to fortify the body and reduce post-operative shock.

Apart from the superb anti-infectious properties of tea tree oil, it is also most effective to help clear bronchial congestion, asthma, coughs, sinusitis, whooping cough and tuberculosis.

On the genito-urinary system, it can be used to help clear vaginal thrush, cystitis and genital infections in general and on the skin, it clears abscesses, acne, burns, herpes, oily skin, athlete’s foot, cold sores, blemishes, diaper rash, warts, sunburn and infected wounds, while fighting dandruff on the scalp.

Eucalypus- 

The Australian Blue-gum can sometimes reaches a height of 100 meters (300 feet), making it one of the highest trees in the world. There are over 500 species of Eucalyptus trees, with tough long and narrow blue-green leaves, creamy white flowers and smooth pale bark.

The ‘eu’ and ‘kalypto’ means ‘well’ and ‘covered’ in Greek, referring to the cup-like membrane that covers the flower bud, which is thrown off as the flower expands.

The Australian Aborigines calls it ‘kino’ and they use the leaves to cover serious wounds. Eucalyptus oil was introduced to Europe in 1788, and the first oil exported to England was called ‘Sydney peppermint’. It was extracted from Eucalyptus peperita which is a more industrial type of oil.

The tree uses a lot of water while growing and has been used to clear water-logged land, draining the water from swamps where malaria mosquito may be found. The tree was thought to prevent malaria in the past, due to this draining action.

Will report back after a few weeks of use